Traumatic Stress Recovery

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a complex and often debilitating disorder characterized by both physiological and psychological symptoms.  Stress is produced by pressure on a system;  it is a by-product of change.

Not all stress is harmful, but even an accumulation of ‘good’ stress can result in fatigue and feelings of burn-out.

There are four basic types of stress:

  • General Stress
  • Cumulative Stress
  • Acute/Traumatic/Critical Incident Stress
  • PTSD:  Severe distress produced only by severe psychological traumatization.

“Good” stress is called eustress;  this is normal and to be expected in response to anything including graduations, the birth of a child, marriage, a job promotion.  “Bad” stress is called distress;  this can be the result of job loss, divorce, toxic relationships, or financial problems.

Trauma is a violent psychological, physical, or spiritual wounding that results in a loss of functioning and sense of identity.

  • Physical:  an insult to the body’s vital systems that control normal life events.
  • Psychological:  an insult to the psyche, resulting in emotional distortions and coping obstruction.
  • Spiritual:  an insult which calls into question one’s standard assurances and convictions about ones’ own worthiness;  it also calls into question God’s function and character.
Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress.L
Regions of the brain affected by PTSD and stress. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Notice that the primary areas of the brain affected by PTSD are the prefrontal cortex, and the amygdala.

 

Related articles

 

 

2 thoughts on “Traumatic Stress Recovery”

  1. Years ago I was talking with this Vietnam veteran and I told him what I went through with my family. He told me that I was suffering from PTSD. I was fairly shocked; I always thought PTSD happened to soldiers in combat. Here is the rest of the story, if you want to read it:

    A Conversation with a Vietnam Veteran
    https://hitchhikeamerica.wordpress.com/2012/04/05/a-conversation-with-a-vietnam-veteran/

    Like

    • Thank you for sharing your story Tim. Survivors of violent crimes, domestic violence, accidents and natural disasters also struggle with PTSD. Anyone whose life has been threatened is susceptible to the effects of trauma. Although sometimes I think that “shell-shock” is still a much better term, as that is exactly how it feels.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s